I Have a Question about English 質問です!

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Jan 21, 2015 10:18

How are you, my friends?

Here is a thing I have been wondering about the difference between two ways to say.

I received a mail magazine this morning that teaches me some English expressions each day. Today's phrase that I learned was "on the dot"!

My question is not about it, but I will quote the paragraph by copying and pasting, in which I want to ask about.

"It's common for many American's to
not use the term "o'clock"when
expressing time. We just simplify it
and say "It's six" instead of
"it's six o'clock." Use "on the dot"
only when you want to emphasize
that it is exactly that time."


Are there any difference between "It's common for many Americans to not use it" and "It's common for many Americans not to use it"?

When I wrote a journal before, I had two way corrections from native English speakers: The sentence is below.

"I've basically tried to not make any predictions about the future because I believe that nobody can know what will happen in a year, in a month, or even in a minute."
"I've basically tried not to make any predictions about the future because I believe that nobody can know what will happen in a year, in a month, or even in a minute."

If you would answer this, I would greatly appreciate it!

_(._.)_


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