(1) Why Are Chinese Patients Killing Their Doctors?

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Feb 19, 2017 02:41
Every few weeks, my former high school classmates who work and live here have a get-together to catch up. Several of them are “doctors.” Some have been practicing for one year or two, the others are interning at hospitals – they are still in med school doing their Ph.D. studies. But they have one thing in common: Upon sitting down, they start to complain about how their lives as doctors suck. Since I’ve heard them gripe million times, I’ve developed a callus to it.

Unlike in many other countries, Chinese students have to attend med school right after graduating from high school if they want to pursue their medical careers. That means if they choose other majors as undergrads in university, they won’t be able to become doctors forever.

It’s not easy to become a doctor at all. The med schools’ score requirements unfailingly rank in the top lists. The medical undergrad education is five years long. The master education at least three years. It takes three to five years to obtain an M.D. The curricula is always full. Even on weekends, the med students still have to take courses or prepare for endless exams.

To practice at a regular hospitals, they need at least a master’s degree. If they want to work in relatively better hospitals, an M.D. is required. So, to be able to work at a good hospital, they have to spend more than ten years working hard at school. But that’s not enough, their performances during all these school years need to be competitive. Worse still, there’s at least one year of residency before they can truly practice.

In China, most reputed/qualified hospitals are state-owned. Private hospitals are generally believed to be full of quacks. The government controls state-owned hospitals, so here comes the first problem: the doctors’ salaries are capped and usually not very high; unlike in the US, doctors’ salaries rank in the top lists.

Also, there is no such thing as a family physician in China, so quite a few people go to see doctors at those reputed state-owned hospitals right when they are ill. Hence, the hospitals are always thronged, which leads to the second problem: every doctor has to meet dozens of outpatients every day.

Therefore, it’s not hard to understand why my former classmates persistently complain that they get little return from their sacrifices. Chinese doctors had good grades in high school, went on to spend more than ten years working freakishly hard in med school, but ended up living hectic lives and receiving less than they should.

As respected as they may seem, why do they actually work at the risk of being stabbed, or even being killed?
每隔几个星期,我的高中同学会聚会,一起叙叙旧。其中有几个是医生,一些人已经工作了一两年了,还有一些在读博士,在医院里实习。他们有一个共同点,每次一坐下来,就开始不停地抱怨医生生活多么悲惨。我都已经听过无数回,耳朵都已经长茧了。

和很多国家不一样,如果想从事医学领域,本科一开始就要学医,如果本科选择其它专业,就一辈子都没机会从医了。

想成为医生很难。医学院的分数线年年居高不下。医学本科要读5年,硕士至少3年,博士3-5年不等。医学院里面的课程表从来都是满满的,甚至周末都没有,要么继续在上课,要么在准备无穷尽的考试。

如果想进城里一般的医院工作,至少要硕士学位。稍微好一点的医院,肯定是博士学位。所以,如果要进好一点的医院当医生,要在医学院寒窗苦读10多年。光读书还不够,成绩还要足够好才能脱颖而出。此外,要正式成为一名医生,至少还要当一年的住院医生。

在中国,资质好一点的医院都是公立的。在人们眼里,私立医完全是江湖庸医的代名词。由于政府直接控制公立医院,所以这里就出现一个问题:医生的工资标准受政府监管,通常不太高。至少不像美国医生那样,收入名列前茅。

另外,中国也没有家庭医生制度分流病人。所以很多人一感到不适,就会往资质好的公立医院跑,因此这些医院常年人满为患,于是导致了第二个问题:每个门诊医生每天要看好几十个病人。

所以,也就不难理解,为什么我的医生同学们,总喜欢不停地抱怨,他们付出没有收获。中国的医生们从小念书的成绩就不错,然后在医学院寒窗苦读十余载,结果在医院工作时,每天忙得团团转,收入和付出却不成正比。

听起来,病人们应该要尊重医生,但为什么实际上他们有可能被别人拿刀捅,在冒着生命危险工作呢?