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Sarahu
  • There two aspects about this.
  • There two aspects to this.
[aspect to] the positive aspects to retirement
Sarahu
  • First, it is bizarre that they have to lie that other children are "friends".
  • First, it is bizarre that they have to lie and say that other children are "friends".
lie は that節を取れない
cuavsfan
The internet might be able to help preserve languages in some way, but like you said it might be more like a "hobby" than a real language and culture. "Little" cultural differences can be difficult to "translate," but they are what buil...
English isn't really "built for" talking about them.
Pat123
  • He turned around and gestured the girl, "Go away."
  • He turned around and gestured to the girl, "Go away."
gesture to sb
He gestured to the guards and they withdrew.
Pat123
  • In the spring, when flowers from cherry blossoms flew in wind, the boy in the school uniform walk on street with a grumpy face, followed by the girl also in the uniform.
  • In the spring, when flowers while petals from cherry blossoms fly in the wind, the boy in the school uniform walks down/up/on the street with a grumpy face, followed by the girl also in the uniform.
  • Your verb tense is inconsistent here. I made a guess.
walk down the street [up as a preposition]
walk up the street [up as a preposition]
walk on the street

He lives just down the street.
She climbed up the flight of steps.
markbellis
  • His wife resumed to became older and then disappeared.
  • His wife resumed to becoming older and then disappeared.
resume doing something
He got back in the car and resumed driving.
markbellis
  • With the muffler the wife was knitting for him in his hands, the man made his mind.
  • With the muffler the wife was knitting for him in his hands, the man made up his mind.
make up your mind | make your mind up

They're both beautiful—I can't make up my mind.
Have you made up your minds where to go for your honeymoon?
You'll never persuade him to stay—his mind's made up (= he has definitely decided to go).
Come on—it's make your mind up time!
markbellis
  • She spoke to him loud via a tin can telephone, perhaps confessing her love with him.
  • She spoke to him loud via a tin can telephone, perhaps confessing her love to him.
love to somebody
cuavsfan
  • Most of the students are teenagers, including 'bad' boys, such as those with blond-dyed hairs and 'Yankees' — in Japanese slung, 'Yankees' ヤンキー refers to yobs —, some of them even voluntarily clean the toilets in the school.
  • Most of the students are teenagers, including 'bad' boys, such as those with blond-dyed hairs and 'Yankees' — in Japanese slung, 'Yankees' ヤンキー refers to yobs —, some of them even voluntarily clean the toilets in the school.
  • Maybe in Ameican English "hoodlums" or "thugs" would work in place of "yobs."
hoodlums
1 (also slang hood especially in North American English) a violent criminal, especially one who is part of a gang

2 a violent and noisy young man
[Synonym]
hooligan

//

thugs
a violent person, especially a criminal
a gang of thugs
billy
  • There is no such a limitation in this school, so they can do greetings as loud as they want.
  • There is no such a limitation in this school, so they can greet others as loud(ly) as they want.
  • "No such limitation", or "not such a limitation". (The word "no" secretly means "not a", so you can't repeat the "a".)
not vs no

the word 'no' secretly means 'not a', so you can't repeat the 'a'.

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