English is (ex)plosive. Part 3 - rhythmic abdominal muscle contraction!?

  •  
  • 1040
  • 5
  • 1
  • English 
May 15, 2011 07:50 pronunciation
Previously, I wrote about the fact that breath by English speakers are by far more energetic and explosive than that by Japanese speakers.
http://lang-8.com/178624/journals/826093/

We don't use stress accents in Japanese, and the each syllable is voiced almost equally in strength without stress. It seems that we don't use much breath to make a syllable compared to English. This is a huge difference.

The difference is often told and taught, but still the picture above (the same one I used in my old entry) shows a shocking difference between two languages.


If you hang a thin paper in front of the mouth of an English speaker, the paper will move back and forth at every word the person utters. In sharp contrast, a thin paper won't move remotely, when it is hung in front of a Japanese mouth.

This is very useful for practise of better pronunciation. Japanese people should learn how to swing the paper efficiently, while English native speakers could learn how to keep it still. In fact, the former is often encouraged by English teachers for Japanese students.


Today, I was recording my English pronunciation for my learning. I thought consonants and vowels were almost OK, if not perfect, and stress accents were mostly clear, but still my voice definitely had a clear Japanese taste. I was wondering what the biggest difference is. Why doesn't my English sound like a stuttering native speaker of English?

Then, I probably found something. When my English sounded more 'English', my abdominal muscles vibrantly and rhythmically contracted and relaxed at every stressed syllable. However, when it sounds somehow more 'Japanese' and flatter, my abdominal muscles were in a constant mild tension. I could tell the difference with my fingers placed on my stomach.


I guess, to produce enormous air blow from your mouth, you, English speakers, do quickly contract your abdominal muscles at every word, don't you? Or am I wrong?

If you could feel the muscle contraction with your fingers on your tummy at every word you speak, please let me know! Negative results are also welcome.


以前、英語話者の息が日本語話者の息よりもはるかに強力で爆発的であることを書きました。

日本語では強勢を使いませんし、個々の音節は強勢なしにほぼ同じ強さで発音されます。英語と比べると、ひとつの音節を発音するのに日本人はあまり息を使っていないようです。これは大きな違いです。

この差はしばしば話題になり、また教えられていますが、それでも上の写真(以前の日記で使った写真と同じ)は、二つの言語の間のショッキングな相違を示すものです。


もし英語話者の口の前に薄い紙を垂らしたら、その紙は、その人が発する一つ一つの単語ごとに前後に揺れ動くでしょう。まったく対照的に、日本人の口の前に薄い紙を垂らしてもピクリとも動かないでしょう。

これは発音の改善のよい練習になります。日本人はどうやって効率的にこの紙をもっと動かすことが出来るかを学ぶべきですし、英語話者はどうやってこの紙をじっとしたままにするかを学べるかもしれません。実際に、前者については、英語教師が日本人の生徒にしばしば奨励しています。


今日、発音練習のために自分の声を録音していました。完璧ではないにせよ、子音と母音はほぼ大丈夫だし、強勢もはっきりしているのに、私の声は間違いなく明らかな日本人の特徴を有していました。一体何が一番違うんだろう、どうして自分の英語はどもりのネイティブのように聞こえないのだろう、と考えていました。

そして、たぶん何かを見つけたように思います。私の英語が「英語」っぽく聴こえるときには、強勢のついた音節ごとに、腹筋が元気よくリズミカルに収縮・弛緩していました。しかし、「日本人」っぽく、より平坦に聴こえるときは、腹筋はずっと軽く緊張したままでした。胃の上に置いた指でこの違いを感じることができました。


みなさん、英語のネイティブの人たちは、口から物凄い息を吐き出すために、単語ごとに腹筋をピクッと収縮させているんじゃないの?それとも私は間違ってるでしょうか?

もしも、お腹に置いた指で、単語ごとに腹筋が収縮するのを感じることができたらどうぞ教えてください。感じられなくても教えてください。
Learn English, Spanish, and other languages for free with the HiNative app