My first impression of Japan after three years in the UK (2)

  •  
  • 1334
  • 3
  • 1
  • English 
Jul 22, 2012 05:10
(previous)
http://lang-8.com/odon/journals/1590549/

But these were easy things. What struck me most was something else.

Before the trip, I was rather anxious and scared of going back to and seeing my country. One of my Japanese colleague worked in the UK for one or two years and then move to the US and spent another year there for her study. When she finally came back to Japan, she was shocked that everything in Japan looked in 'grey'. She told me that she felt like she moved from the world of colour TV to that of black-and-white TV. I was wondering if this could be the case for me as well.

It was the case. In the international airport, everything looked grey. You could argue that it could be just the colour of airport buildings. However, the world still looked grey, when I took a bus and then took a train. After all, I felt the same throughout my stay in Japan.

It was shocking, even though I'd already heard of it.

The grey colour can partly arise from buildings made of naked concrete. But you can find such things easily in London as well. I think the grey colour was actually coming from 'noise', i.e. the lack of united style in architecture. Each building on a street uses different colour of materials. Buildings on a street have different heights. There's not a style in architecture on a street. Furthermore, there are loads of electronic cables running across at a height. Along the pavement you can always see white guard rails. There are also fascia and signs. As a whole, the view of a street becomes quite noisy.

Then, where does the noisy randomness in architecture come from?

It could be a traditional Japanese thing. Toshio Suzuki, the head of the famouse Studio Ghibuli told an interesting story. When Hayao Miyazaki made 'Howl's moving castle', some French newspapers praised his design of the moving castle, which looked kind of asymmetry random mixture of many things. In Suzuki's opinion, that was because people in the Western world are so much accustomed to think of a grand design before going to details. The way Miyazaki created the castle was the total opposite. He started with an artillery and then drew a house at the bottom. Then added many different things to the castle one by one. Finally, he spent much of time about how to move the castle and ended up with legs of chicken.

Suzuki thinks that this may be a typical Japanese way of building something. He introduced an episode about Japanese traditional architecture. During the Edo Period, houses of samurai in Edo looked quite complicated. Foreigners often come to see them and are quite confused. Then they ask if they can have a look at a blueprint for those houses. During the Edo Period, however, people in Edo didn't have a blueprint for their houses. How did they built houses without a blueprint? They built the main pillar at first. The quality of entire building was dependent of the quality of the main pillar determines. After the pillar, they started making doors and decide the room size. After one room was made, they then start thinking of the next room. But they still didn't have a toilet, bathroom or entrance. They came after other things. There was a unit size (90 x 180 cm) straw mat 'tatami' available. So they added rooms just like playing Lego. In short, Japanese architecture is basically about adding something one by one.

This was in stark contrast to Western architecture. As typically seen in churches, all churches have the shape of a cross if you look at them from the sky. In the front view, they are symmetrical. This kind of symmetric design is also common for standard houses. The Western people start from a grand design and go to details, whereas Japanese people start from details and go to the whole thing.

Source
http://bizmakoto.jp/makoto/articles/1011/25/news024.html


Another factor, in my personal opinion, is denial of traditional style especially after the WWII.

Even though they were built without a grand design, traditional architecture surely had its own architectonic style, which was developed over several hundred years or even more through the history. You can still find streets with traditional buildings (often called 'machiya' 町家 etc) at sight seeing spots, such as Kyoto, Takayama, and Kurashiki. Those styles were now almost completely lost from the modern architecture. Although new types of buildings appeared soon after Japan started trades with the Western world, I think that the traditional styles were largely abandoned after the WWII.

When Japan was defeated by the US in WWII, the emperor Hirohito made a radio broadcast speech, called "玉音放送", on 15 August 1945. This was the most shocking moment for most Japanese people then. First, for most Japanese people it was their first opportunity to hear the the voice of the emperor, who was believed to be a living god during the war. Second, the living god himself admitted that the country surrendered. After this historical moment, the ideology in Japan flipped over by 180 degrees. Soon the emperor declared himself as a human. Everything taught and believed before was denied by the same teachers. Since buildings were burned, people lived in a simple houses with simple materials, called in Japanese 'バラック' (barracks).

Decades later, with some lucks and people's efforts, the country's economy grew rapidly. However, to my eyes, the 'grey' modern buildings in cities looked like a highly sophisticated version of 'barracks', because much of them don't inherit architectonic traditions from the pre-war period. These days, "purely Japanese style" houses are expensive and quite rare.

So, basically, I went back to Japan in 2012 and personally felt I saw traces of WWII everywhere within.

(next)
http://lang-8.com/odon/journals/1590716/
しかしこれらは簡単なほうです。私が一番衝撃を受けたのは別のことです。

旅の前に、私は自分の国に帰ってそれを見ることがやや不安で恐れていました。私の日本人の同僚の一人は、イギリスで1,2年働いた後、アメリカでさらに1年研究のために過ごしました。最後に日本へ戻ってきた時、彼女は日本の全てが「灰色」に見えたことにショックを覚えたそうです。それはカラーテレビの世界から白黒テレビの世界へ移動するような感じだったそうです。私も同じような経験をすることになるのだろうかと思っていました。

この話の通りでした。国際空港では、すべてが灰色に見えました。それは空港の建物の色に過ぎないんじゃないの、と仰るかもしれません。しかし、その後バスに乗り、それから電車に乗っても、世界は灰色のままでした。結局、私の滞在期間全体を通じて同じように感じました。

あらかじめ話に聞いていたとはいえ、これはショッキングでした。

この灰色は部分的にはむき出しのコンクリートでできた建物の色から来ているのかもしれません。しかし、そういった建物はロンドンでも簡単に見つけることができます。この灰色は「ノイズ」、すなわち統一された建築様式の欠如から生じているのではないか、と思っています。通りのそれぞれの建物が違った色の建材を使っています。同じ通りにある建物の高さはバラバラです。通りの建築に様式がありません。さらには、高いところに電線が張り巡らされています。歩道にそっていつも真っ白なガードレールが走っています。さらには店の看板があります。全体として、通りの景観は非常にゴチャゴチャしたものになっています。

このゴチャゴチャした乱雑さは一体どこからやってきたのでしょうか?

これは日本の伝統的なものかもしれません。有名なスタジオジブリの社長、鈴木敏夫はある興味深い話を語っています。宮崎駿が「ハウルの動く城」を作った時、フランスの新聞は彼の動く城のデザインを絶賛しました。その城は非対称の非常にゴチャゴチャしたものでした。鈴木の意見によると、これは西洋世界の人たちが細部に行く前に全体のデザインを考えるということにあまりにも慣れきっているからだそうです。宮崎が城を作っていったやり方はまったく逆でした。彼はまず大砲をひとつ描き、その足元に家を描きました。それからその城にいろいろなものをひとつずつ付け加えていきました。最後に彼は長い時間をかけてどうやって城を動かすか思案した挙句、最後は鶏の足をくっつけました。

鈴木はこのやり方は日本の伝統的なものの作り方ではないかと考えます。彼は日本の伝統的な建物についての話を紹介しています。江戸時代の武家屋敷は非常に複雑なものでした。外国人がそれを見に来ると、相当困惑するそうです。そして彼らは設計図を見せてくれ、と言います。しかし江戸時代には人々は設計図を持っていなかったというのです。それでは設計図もなしにどうやって家を建てていたのでしょうか?彼らはまず床柱を立てます。床柱の品質が家全体の品質を決めるのでこれは重要でした。柱の後で、戸を作って、部屋の大きさを決めます。ある部屋ができたら次の部屋を作りますが、この時点では便所、風呂、玄関がどこになるのかまだ決まっていません。これらは他のものの後で決められます。畳の大きさが標準化されていましたから、レゴを組み立てるように、部屋を足していったのです。つまり日本の建物は何かを順番に追加していくことで作られました。

これは西洋の建築とは対照的です。教会の建築に典型的に見られますが、すべての教会は空から見ると十字架の形をしていて、正面から見ると左右対称になっています。このような対照的なデザインは一般的な家にも見られます。西洋人は全体のデザインから始めて細部に行くのに対し、日本人は細部から始めて全体に行く、というわけです。


もうひとつの要素は、私の個人的な見解になりますが、第二次大戦後の伝統的様式の否定です。

日本の家が全体のデザインを欠いたまま作られるといっても、伝統的な建築は建築様式を有していました。この様式は数百年以上の歴史を経て形成されてきたものです。今日でも伝統的建築(「町家」と呼ばれたりします)でできた通りが京都、高山、倉敷などの観光地には残っています。しかし、この様式は現代の建築からはほぼ排除されています。日本が西洋社会と交易を始めて以来、すぐに新しい種類の建築が増えましたが、伝統的な建築様式は第二次大戦後になってからほぼ廃れたように私は思っています。

日本が第二次大戦でアメリカ合衆国に敗れた時、昭和天皇は1945年8月15日にラジオで玉音放送を行いました。これは当時の多くの日本人にとって最も衝撃的な瞬間でした。第一に、現人神と信じられてきた昭和天皇の肉声を聞くのは、ほとんどの日本人にとって初めてでした。第二に、その現人神が日本の降伏を認めました。この歴史的瞬間以降、日本のイデオロギーは180度転換することになります。すぐに天皇の人間宣言がありました。以前教えられてきたことが同じ教師たちによって否定されることになりました。建物は燃えたので、人々は簡素な建材の掘っ立て小屋「バラック」に住みました。

数十年が経って、幾つかの幸運と人々の努力の甲斐があって、日本経済は急速に発展しました。しかし、私の目には、戦前の古い建築の伝統を受け継いでいない日本の現代建築は、戦後の「バラック」の洗練されたもののように映りました。今日では「純和風建築」は高価でかなり稀です。

そういうわけで、2012年に日本へ行って、私は第二次大戦の傷跡を至るところに見た、そんな思いがしました。
Learn English, Spanish, and other languages for free with the HiNative app