Popular corrections

These corrections got a lot of 'native nods' recently. ('Public' entries only.)

  • It's snowing at north area in Japan.
  • It's snowing in the northern part of Japan.
  • Native Nods 1 Notebook 0
  • Wednesday, December 13th
  • There are person who lived in Japan 23 years don't speak Japanese.
  • There are people who live in Japan 23 years can't speak Japanese.
  • don't speak is different from can't speak
  • Native Nods 1 Notebook 0
  • 23 years
  • Take it easy, Japan is the very kindly to foreigners.
  • Take it easy, Japan is the very kindly to foreigners.
  • Native Nods 1 Notebook 0
  • 23 years
  • If Japanese who stay foreign countries and don't speak a local language, they wouldn't live there.
  • If Japanese who stay in foreign countries and can't speak a local language, they wouldn't live there.
  • Native Nods 1 Notebook 0
  • 23 years
  • People in the US do not use "line"?
  • Why don't people in the US use Line?
  • I don't know what question you meant to ask, so I guessed.
  • Native Nods 1 Notebook 0
  • People in the US do not use "line"?
  • Exchange of messages, telephone, sending photos, etc.
  • Messaging, making calls, sending photos, etc.,
  • Native Nods 1 Notebook 0
  • People in the US do not use "line"?
  • But Americans say they do not know the "line".
  • However, Americans say they do not know of Line.
  • Try not to use conjunctions like "but" to start a sentence. "However" is okay and means the same thing.
  • Native Nods 1 Notebook 0
  • People in the US do not use "line"?
  • But Americans say they do not know the "line".
  • But Americans say they do not know about this app / "Line".
  • Native Nods 1 Notebook 0
  • People in the US do not use "line"?
  • Is not "line" used in the United States?
  • Is Line used in the United States?
  • Native Nods 1 Notebook 0
  • People in the US do not use "line"?
  • If not, it's all good.
  • If not, it's all good.
  • Native Nods 0 Notebook 0
  • Kind of long.

These are corrections which were bookmarked (added to your notebook) recently ('Public' entries only.)

  • May 2007 - Despite to have 10 months, Bubba Ludwig by Illinions state, United States is oficcially authorized to carry a rifle that his grandfather letf to him as inheritance.
  • May 2007 - Despite being only 10 months old, Bubba Ludwig of Illinois (USA) was officially authorized to carry a rifle that his grandfather left to him as an inheritance.
  • Native Nods 0 Notebook 1
  • 10 months Baby receives permit to carry a weapon
  • The process was carry out by his father Howard Ludwig, who paid 5 dollars and filled out the request where the Budda’s photo appears and a single doodle as a signature.
  • The process was carried out by his father Howard Ludwig, who paid 5 dollars and filled out the request in which the Bubba's photo appears along with a single doodle as a signature.
  • Native Nods 0 Notebook 1
  • 10 months Baby receives permit to carry a weapon
  • I think I've heard "getting played" and "been played" a couple of times this week, so I tried to make up a sentence using one of them, and it seems like "you've been played" isn't good English.
  • I think I've heard "getting played" and "been played" a couple of times this week, so I tried to make up a sentence using one of them, and it seems like "you've been played" isn't good English.
  • It sounds fine to me.
  • Native Nods 0 Notebook 0
  • Kind of long.
  • So now, I'm wondering about what would be the proper or normal way to say a phrase like this: "you've been played because there's no party here." The first two things that come to my mind are "they lied to you because there's not a party here" and "they were messing with you because there's not a party here." But I can't tell for sure because my English level is far from being good, sadly.
  • So now, I'm wondering (about) what would be the proper or normal way to say a phrase like this: "you've been played because there's no party here." The first two things that come to my mind are "they lied to you because there's not a party/no party here" and "they were messing with you because there's not a party/no party here." But I can't tell for sure because sadly, my English level is far from being good.
  • It sounds better if you take out "about" in the first sentence, but I don't think it's wrong if you include it. I would say your two suggestions are right on. It could also be "they tricked you because there's not a party here/no party here." Your original sentence "you've been played because there's no party here" makes sense to me.
  • Native Nods 0 Notebook 0
  • Kind of long.
  • Also, is it common for people in the States to use "you've been played"?
  • Also, is it common for people in the States to use "you've been played"?
  • I think so, although it's not something I use a lot. It's usually used in terms of a relationship, although it can be used for other situations where someone has been lied to/manipulated.
  • Native Nods 0 Notebook 0
  • Kind of long.
  • Or would you use something totally different?
  • Or would you use something totally different?
  • There are a lot of different options you could use. Any of the ones listed above would work. Some others would be: They were fucking/fucked with you because there's no party here. You were/got fucked with because there's no party here. They were screwing/screwed with you because there's no party here. I probably wouldn't use any of these for this situation, but I thought I'd share them with you so you know about them. For this situation, I would normally go for something like: You were lied to because there's no party here./They lied to you because there's no party here. You were tricked because there's no party here./They tricked you because there's no party here.
  • Native Nods 0 Notebook 0
  • Kind of long.
  • I'm not really interested in formal English, but it's a good thing to know both sides.
  • I'm not really interested in formal English, but it's a good thing to know both sides.
  • Or: I'm not really interested in formal English, but it's good to know both sides/types.
  • Native Nods 0 Notebook 0
  • Kind of long.
  • So if you can share your phrase or whatever you say in cases like that, that would be great.
  • So if you can share your phrase or whatever you say in cases like that, that would be great.
  • Native Nods 0 Notebook 0
  • Kind of long.
  • If not, it's all good.
  • If not, it's all good.
  • Native Nods 0 Notebook 0
  • Kind of long.
  • Good Afternoon
  • Good Afternoon!
  • Native Nods 0 Notebook 0
  • Good Afternoon