Japanese women don't want to get married to an eldest son because they have to take care of their husband's parents

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Jan 30, 2013 17:34
Long time ago, the civil law determined that the eldest son would inherit the fortune and the patriarchal rights of the family in Japan but the system was abolished after World WarⅡ.
However, even now most Japanese people have been thinking that the eldest son should take care of their aging parents.
In fact, the eldest son's wife should take care of her hasband's parents so the eldest son's wife is so stressed.
There are a lot of dramas about the troubles between mother's-in-law and daughter's-in-law.
That's why we clarify "This is my eldest son" or "I have a yongest brother."

On the other hand, westerners say, "My sister lives in London."
They say nothing as to whether their sister is older or younger.
They don't care such kind of issue.

I have a question for you.
Who should take of your aging parents among your family?
The one of your family members who lives near your parents?

However, in Japan, the birth rate is decreasing and regardless of sex, one child has to take care of own parents now.

http://youtu.be/9SJay2LUnAw
日本では昔、長男が家の財産と戸主権を相続することが定められていましたが、第二次世界大戦後にそれは廃止されました。
しかし今でも、多くの日本人が、長男が年老いた両親の面倒をみるべきだと考えています。
つまり実際には長男の嫁が夫の両親の面倒をみなければいけないので、ものすごくストレスを感じます。
姑と嫁の争いについてそれはたくさんのドラマがあります。
なので私たちは「これが私の長男です」「私には弟がいます」などと明確にします。

一方、欧米人は「私の姉妹はロンドンに住んでいます」と言います。
姉なのか妹なのかはっきり言いません。
彼らはそんなことは気にしていません。

みなさんに質問があります。
あなたの家族では年老いた両親の面倒は誰がみるのですか?
両親の近くに住んでいる家族の誰かですか?

とはいえ日本では、出生率は減り続けて女だろうが男だろうがが両親の世話をしなければならなくなっています。