Life Isn’t Necessarily Nasty.

  •  
  • 1372
  • 4
  • 3
  • English 
Jan 4, 2015 19:20
On New Year’s day in 2015, my two daughters and I went to Kotobukicyo to serve foods for homeless people, day workers or retired elderly people who live in that town. Around 9 am, 20 to 30 volunteers gathered at the park located in the middle of the town, and started to cut vegetables into small cubes to make a Japanese New Year’s dish, Zoni. Zoni is a traditional soup dish containing rice cake, vegetables or meat, and people put different ingredients from regions to regions.

It was freezing cold on that day, but quite a number of people started to stand in line in the early afternoon. Because of the long queue, I didn’t even know where the last person was standing. To my great joy, I was able to see some of my good old foreign friends there. They were a Pilipino missionary, her husband and her children, a Singaporean friend and her daughter.

While serving foods all together, I had a mixed feelings. First of all, I felt very sorry for the people who had to wait for so long to get just a cup of soup. I was angry at the Japanese government that helps to increase the gap between rich and poor. It’s odd to say this but, honestly, I was happy to see those who came to do something for others on such a snowy day. I just thought that life isn’t necessarily nasty.
2015年の元旦、二人の娘と私は寿町のホームレス、日雇い労働者、リタイアした高齢者への炊き出しに行った。だいたい9時頃、20〜30人のボランティアが町の中心の公園に集まり、正月料理の雑煮を作るため野菜を細かく切り始めた。雑煮というのは日本の伝統的なスープ料理で、中に野菜、餅、肉などが入っている。地域によって異なる具材を入れたりする。

その日は凍てつくような寒さだったが、非常に多くの人たちが午後早くに一列に並び始めた。あまりにも長い行列で、私は最後の人がどこに立っているのかさえわからなかった。喜ぶべきことは、私はそこで、何人かの古き良き外国人の友人に会えた。フィリピン人の女性宣教師と彼女の夫、子供達、シンガポール人、そして彼女の娘さんだった。

みんなで一緒に食事を提供しながら私は、複雑な心境だった。まず最初に、たった一杯のスープのためにこんなにも長い時間並ばなければならない人に対して本当に申し訳なかった。貧富の差をどんどん拡大させる日本政府に怒りを感じた。そして、これを言うのは奇妙だが、正直、雪の中、他者のために何かをするために、ここにやってくる人たちがいることに対して私は温かい気持ちがした。この世も捨てたものではないな...と。