Should scholarships be offered primarily on the basis of financial need, rather than on academic achievement?

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Feb 20, 2011 14:58
I disagree with the idea that scholarships should be offered mainly based on financial need, rather than on academic achievement. There are two reasons for this: the ability of students and the prosperity of students and schools.

The ability of the student is the first reason why scholarships should be given primally on the basis of academic achievement. Students motivate not only to develop their ability to solve various problems they will face when they get out into the world but also to get scholarships to make their life easier. According to the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, students in those schools which scholarships are offered primarily on the basis of academic achievement get better scores than ones which scholarships are given mainly based on financial need. More and more student become intelligent. As a result, it become more and more difficult for even intelligent students to get scholarships and they studied harder to offer it. It is good for both students and schools.

The second reason why scholarships should be offered primally on the basis of academic achievement is the prosperity of students and schools.Students graduate from schools and get out into the world. Students who made great efforts and get scholarships are intelligent, so they can flourish all over the world such as founding big companies such as Google or Apple. They become famous and get a lot of money. As a result, they subscribe billions of yen to their school and it can be used in scholarships. It makes schools better. This shows again how related the prosperity of students and schools is with the scholarships offered primally based on academic achievement.

Thus, because of the ability of the students and the prosperity of students and schools, I disagree with the idea that scholarships should be offered mainly based on financial need, rather than on academic achievement. There are two reasons for this: the ability of students and the prosperity of schools.