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icepatton
  • Ethiopia is not a hot country, whose average temperature is around 23 degrees.
  • Ethiopia is not a hot country, with an average temperature of around 23 degrees.

Aug 16, 2018 11:05 Public With a Man from Ethipia
tony
  • I hadn't written here since I started my new job.
  • I hadn't/haven't written here since I started my new job. [Alternative: This is my first time writing here since I started my new job.]
  • "Hadn't" is technically correct, since it describes the time in the past before you started writing the current entry, but it is usually used for a reference time further in the past.

Apr 8, 2018 10:28 Public I hadn't written here s...
tony
  • So they became a quit simply green house.
  • So they have become quite simply a green house. [Alternative: So they now actually have the form of a green house.]
  • I think it's a bit odd to think of the plants by themselves as constituting a "house". I would describe the situation as follows: "The greenhouse, with its new coat of plants, has actually turned into a green house." I assume that you were translating まさに by "quite simply". If so, it modifies the verb "become", not the noun phrase "green house". I think "actually" is a better translation in this sentence.

Aug 23, 2016 11:43 Public Our Green House
tony
  • My husband planted seeds of bitter gourd (voluble stem) along the building frames of a greenhouse at the beginning of summer in this year.
  • My husband planted seeds of bitter gourd (voluble stem) along the perimeter of a greenhouse at the beginning of this summer.
  • "Perimeter" is not a translation of 枠組み-- it's close in meaning to まわり-- but I think it expresses what you are trying to say clearly in this sentence.

Aug 23, 2016 11:43 Public Our Green House
tony
"Scold" and "scald" are two different words with entirely different meanings, and pronunciations which sound very different to a native English speaker. Here are sound recordings; try to hear the difference. http://howjsay.com/index.php?...
tony
Punctuation Marks and Blank Spaces http://lang-8.com/48539/journals/282739012266734041103386410104575682073 Simple Past, Present Perfect and Past Perfect Tenses http://www.lang-8.com/48539/journals/737185 http://www.lang-8.com/4853...
tony
  • We've been married for more than 33 years and our three kids left us.
  • We've been married for more than 33 years and our three kids (have) left us. [Alternatives: ... and our three kids are no longer at home. ... and our three kids have left the nest.]
  • The simple past tense is usually used for an action at a single time in the past, so "our three kids left us" can be misunderstood as meaning that they all did so at the same time. "Our three kids have left us" is a bit more natural. Even if it happened a long time ago, the emphasis of the statement is on the present situation which is the result of those actions; the fact that you and your husband now live with each other and no one else.

Jan 7, 2016 23:15 Public Relationship with My Husband
tony
  • When my husband saw the article on the newspaper yesterday, he said, "Why don't we go to Hokkaidou?"
  • When my husband saw the article in the newspaper yesterday, he said, "Why don't we go to Hokkaidou?"
  • "On" is used for the outer surface of something. For example, you might refer to the writing on the cover of a book. For the contents inside a book, newspaper or magazine, use "in".

Jan 7, 2016 23:09 Public Relationship with My Husband
tony
  • Hokkaidou Shinkansen (Hakkaidou Super Express) will be open to traffic on coming March 26.
  • Hokkaidou Shinkansen (Hakkaidou Super Express) will start running/operating on coming March 26. [Alternative: ... will be open to passengers starting March 26.]
  • "Open to traffic" is how you would describe a new highway on which cars and other vehicles could drive for the first time. You can say "... will start running this coming March 26", but just saying "March 26" by itself with a future tense verb means "this coming March 26". Note that in UK English, the date would be "26 March" instead. The phrase "the 26th of March" is used in both dialects.

Jan 7, 2016 23:08 Public Relationship with My Husband
tony
  • I read about a fourteen-year-old boy who hung himself on July 30th in the newspaper.
  • I read (a report) in the newspaper about a fourteen-year-old boy who hung himself on July 30th.
  • Putting "in the newspaper" at the end of the sentence is called a "dangling modifier". It is not immediately clear whether it modifies the verb phrase "read" (as you intended) or the verb phrase "hung himself". "Hung himself in the newspaper" doesn't make sense, but it is still very awkward to put the prepositional phrase somewhere where the reader has to do that reasoning to figure out your intended meaning. Word order is more important in English than in Japanese.

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