The radioactive threat

  •  
  • 537
  • 5
  • 4
Jul 10, 2009 22:37
I wanted to write down in my diary about an A-bomb, after reading paco-san's entry  "Humans and nuclear weapons cannot coexist.".
I'm sorry to trouble you, but let me tell about my family.
My parents also went to Hiroshima to gather the remains of their sister after dropping of the A-bomb.
My father died from gastric cancer 31 years ago and
my mother died from colorectal cancer 25 years ago.
They had gotten a hibakusha health book.
I cannot help believing that there is a strong cause-and-effect relation between A-bomb and their death. I didn't want to believe that radioactivity influence beyond a generation. But my elder brother contracted colorectal cancer and had an operation for cancer 2 years ago.
He lives bravely with metastasis scare.
Because I inherits the genes of both its parents, I sometimes have a vague uneasiness.
I believe a progress in the medical sciences and live at the present. I think that the real fear of A-bomb is in a psychology of people who died from illnesses caused
by A-bomb radiation.
I'd like to introduce a story of Sadako Sasaki here in this entry.
Sadako Sasaki was two years old when the bomb was dropped on her home city of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. Sadako seemed to escape any ill effects after her exposure to the bomb, until, ten years later, she developed leukemia, "the atom bomb disease."
When she was in the hospital, her friend Chizuko brought her a folded paper crane and told her the story about it. According to Japanese legend, the crane lives for
a thousand years, and a sick person who folds a thousand cranes will become well again.
Sadako folded cranes throughout her illness. The flock hung above her bed on strings.
When she died at the age of twelve, Sadako had folded six hundred and forty-four cranes.
Classmates folded the remaining three hundred and fifty-six cranes, so that one thousand were buried with Sadako.
In 1958, with contributions from school children, a statue was erected in Hiroshima Peace Park, dedicated to Sadako and to all children who were killed by the atom bomb.(quoting from the Net)
BTW, A photo on my HP is the children's Peace Monument.


---------------------

pacoさんのエントリー「人間と核兵器は共存し得ない」を読んで、原爆について日記に書きたくなりました。
私事で恐縮ですが、自分の家族について述べさせてください。私の両親も原爆投下後に彼らの姉妹の遺骨を収集するために広島入りしました。私の父は31年前に胃癌で亡くなり、母は大腸癌で25年前に亡くなりました。
原爆手帳を取得していた二人ですから私は原爆と彼らの死には強い因果関係があることを信じざるを得ません。でも、放射線が世代を超えて影響を与えるということを信じたくありませんでした。
ところが、私の兄が2年前に大腸癌に罹り、手術を受けました。彼は転移に怯えながらも気丈に頑張っております。両親の遺伝子を受け継いでいるので、私はときどき漠然とした不安を抱くことがあります。私は現在の医療の進歩を信じ、生きております。
原爆の本当の恐怖は原爆の放射能による病気で死んでいった人々の心理にあると思います。
ここに、私は佐々木禎子さんの話を紹介したいです。
1945年8月6日に爆弾が広島の彼女の故郷に投下されたときサダコは2歳でした。
サダコは彼女の白血病(原爆病)がひどくなる10年後まで、被弾した後、如何なる病気にも打ち勝っていた様です。
彼女が病院にいた時、彼女の友達であるチズコが折紙のツルを持ってきてそれに関わる話をしました。
ツルは千年生きるとされ、千羽のツルを折ると病人は再び元気になるという言い伝えが日本にはあります。
サダコは療養中にツルを折りました。その折ツルはひもを通してベッドの上に掛けられていました。
彼女が12の歳で亡くなったとき、644羽のツルを折っていました。クラスメートが残りの356羽のツルを折りました。それで、千羽のツルがサダコと一緒に埋められました。
1958年に学童の寄付で、銅像が広島平和公園に建造され、原爆で亡くなったサダコや全ての子供達に捧げられました。(ネットから引用)
ちなみに私のホームページの写真は原爆の子の像です。