" Fukushima Renaissance "( #311fromjapan)< in English >

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Feb 18, 2012 00:22 #311fromjapan
"Fukushima Renaissance"


I hesitated to return to my hometown in Fukushima due to the
contamination caused by the nuclear leak at Fukushima Atomic
Power Plant on March 11, 2011. The wind has spread cesium from
the plant all across the prefecture. It is said to be a potential
cause of cancer for children and babies in the future. After
hesitating for a few days, I decided to go back there in spite of
this, for I believed I was too old to contract cancer from the
fall-out.I went there by express bus in August. When I got off,
the fields spread out before me as far as the eye could see.


I can't believe
they have been contaminated
by cesium winds,
standing before the green, green,
brilliant rice fields.


I stayed at my brother's house and took a walk with my
nephews the next day. One of them said, "Oh, I’ve
forgotten to take a dosimeter with me. " He immediately went
back home and brought it back with him. We walked to a
park by a river.


Dosimeters
hanging from their necks
even when the children
play tag with me
in the green park.


One day I went sightseeing at a famous tourist attraction with
my brother’s family, but there were few visitors there due to
a fear of cesium, though it used to be crowded in the
past with many children on summer vacation.


Come back,
come back,
my former Fukushima
where children could play
outside with their parents.


After the fall-out, many parents and public servants
began to clean cesium from the grounds of all preschools,
primary schools, and high schools in Fukushima. The
residents have been cleaning their houses, gardens
and roads. Farmers have been sweeping away the cesium
from their fields,forests and mountains for months.
Lots of inhabitants have been trying to clean all of Fukushima.


Earth and wind,
pears and peaches,
cats and humans,
may all beings
revive in Fukushima.


I go to Miharu town near the nuclear plants to see the
beautiful cherry blossoms every spring. The famous tree
there is about 1,000 years old. It's very large and the
blossoms spread into the blue sky. The residents call it
"Takizakura" because "taki" means a waterfall and "zakura" means
cherry blossoms in Japanese. The blossoms look like a pink
waterfall cascading from the azure sky. I will go
there to get revitalized by the cherry blossoms next spring.


We'll sing a song
and dance again
around the tall,spreading cherry
in our hometown,
Fukushima.